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I want to live at Dogtown

There was a show on the National Geographic channel a few years ago set at an Animal Sanctuary in Utah called “Best Friends.” They have separate enclosures for birds and cats and rabbits and horses and pigs, and the section for dogs is called Dogtown.

dogtown

The show focused on their work with last chance dogs, and how they try to give them better lives. Each dog has a team of veterinarians and groomers and trainers and volunteers looking out for them, and coming up with creative ideas for how to help them with problems other shelters couldn’t solve. So a half-blind, ten year old dog, who couldn’t walk on a leash, had people brainstorming ways to help him live his best possible life. And, if they couldn’t find him a forever home, he would always have a home at the sanctuary.

The Dogtown staff

The Dogtown staff

Dogtown represents the kind of safety net I wish we all had, pets and humans alike, because the volunteers and groomers and vets and trainers at Dogtown seemed to be infused with a level of compassion and persistence you don’t find in regular life. The problem is that most shelters are not Dogtown. Some have the compassion, but not the skill, or they have the volunteers, but not the money, or the space.

            The shelter where we got Butterfly subsidizes her medical care, and sends buses to pick up dogs from puppy mills all the time, but they have no mandate to train the dogs, or help them overcome social deficits. Their goal is to send the dogs out to new homes as soon as possible.

My Butterfly, with her Duckie

My Butterfly, with her Duckie

Dogtown, the TV show, went into different aspects of dog rescue work: fostering, volunteering, emergency interventions off site, veterinary care and training. And I kept wanting to be part of what they were doing. They made it look possible, even when they were crying, or struggling to come up with answers. I imagined myself in all of the different jobs, but I couldn’t quite believe I’d be up to the challenge. I don’t think I would be good at short term foster care, for example. My heart would keep breaking without enough time to heal in between dogs. I know myself well enough to know I don’t have the Teflon for that.

            I’ve wanted to work with dogs for a long time. When I was in my early twenties, I volunteered at a small no kill shelter, because I thought it might be something I’d be good at. But the established volunteers made me feel like I was in the way and they were doing me a favor by letting me help out with the cats. Dogs were too advanced for a beginner like me, they said. I started to believe that my need to be helpful was actually selfish and a character flaw.

            Recently, after watching repeats of old episodes of Dogtown, I was inspired to look into volunteering again, and found a class advertized at a nearby shelter. Mom wrote to them to ask for information and the email they sent back said that we could take their class in how to volunteer, but we’d be damn lucky if they had an actual spot for us in their schedule, ever. I’m paraphrasing. But the message I heard was, of course you want to volunteer with dogs, so does everyone else. What makes you so special?

            My dream would be to have my own menagerie of dogs to take care of at my own home, without other people around to tell me I’m not good enough. I’d need more money, and time to make sure the dogs have all of the love and medical care and training they need to thrive. I think I could be good at that.

Butterfly and Cricket

Butterfly and Cricket

My Dina

My Dina

Delilah

Delilah

and one of her many puppies

and one of her many puppies

Rachel dog, my first babysitter

Rachel dog, my first babysitter

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About rachelmankowitz

I am a fiction writer, a writing coach, and an obsessive chronicler of my dogs' lives.

93 responses »

  1. I am sure you would be really good at it!

    Reply
  2. Dogtown was an amazing show…amazing people too. I bet Best Friends would LOVE to have you come volunteer for a week some time, if you are ever interested. I’m dying to do that some day…so I’m projecting! I’m sorry you’ve gotten negative responses from volunteer groups. They are biting their own noses to spite their faces.

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    • I loved how welcoming they all seemed at Dogtown. The whole show was meant to inspire people to feel more comfortable and capable of being involved with dog rescue. I wish they could do another version of the show, with staff from Dogtown coming to local shelters and helping transform the atmosphere.

      Reply
  3. Best Friends encourages people to go and volunteer, so take a vacation to check it out! I’ve never been (can’t travel due to money and animal issues — hard to find someone I trust to watch 5 dogs that don’t all get along!), but my parents toured the facility about 3 years ago and loved it.

    Also, shame on the volunteers at that shelter! I’ve volunteered at my local no-kill for almost 12 years, and everyone is a beginner at some point. Unfortunately, without structured volunteer programs it can be hard to become established, and I have to admit that I’ve been guilty of getting snippy with newbies (we had someone honestly tell adopters that we didn’t adopt puppies out under 5 months old because he confused the rule about not WALKING the younger dogs due to health concerns with the adoption policy!). If you ever feel up to trying another shelter or rescue group do it! You obviously have a lot of love for animals, which goes a long way.

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    • I’m trying to keep an open mind. It just feels like I’d have to wear armor to walk into another shelter and ask if I can help. I don’t do well when people give me the pinchy face and the once over (ten times). We’ll see.

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  4. Some days i feel like i’m running Dog Town at Casa de Canterbury with our Pack! But I know what you mean. Sometimes I much prefer the company of dogs to most people I know!!
    One of my neighbors on Worsham Street is involved in a rescue program for dogs and does short-term fostering and I say bless all the souls who can do that, but I lack the temperament for it. I don’t have short-term attachment abilities with dogs. 🙂

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  5. I love that show too!!
    I wanted to start a dog sitting business, run it out of my home. But, it’s pretty expensive taking care of dogs even if its a for a few hours or a few days at a time. My bianca isn’t really friendly with other dogs as well. She’s a rescue and I think she is just so scared and traumatized of being rejected or replaced so when she sees another dog she gets defensive. I feed a stray cat and every time i go outside to feed the cat Bianca tries to stop me running circles around me. She is so jealous. So that idea never really progressed any further. But I love animals. It is really selfish sometimes, wanting to work and care for animals. But it’s also rewarding not only for ourselves but for the animals too. Sometimes the animal needs the fussing over and extra TLC. And if anyone deserves some TLC i think its our furry friends.

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    • Totally agree! Cricket thinks she should be getting massages at half hour intervals, each lasting for half an hour. I wonder if there is a training program so I could become an official doggy masseuse. Cricket and Butterfly are ready to be my training buddies.

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  6. I’m sure you would be really good at it. Your are more than good enough to work with dogs – for me you are the perfect person for this job.

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  7. Rachel, please do not give up. There are a lot of rescue places and organizations that would benefit greatly from your desire to help and make a difference on a dog’s life. I, just like you, had a similar experience. I contacted BARCS here in Maryland and the person that runs that organization did not seem to be interested in my help. It was a very short e-mail that I received from him telling me, “you have to have health insurance, otherwise, you cannot volunteer.” He did not even tell me other ways that I could have helped, maybe fostering, or going to help when they have adoption events. This discouraged me greatly, but then I said to myself, “I am going to let someone get on my way. Since When?” I’ve always done what I believe deeply in my heart and regardless of how hard my journey has been to obtain such goal I’ve always been successful, so I tell you again, do not give up. Find another rescue organization and do your best. I will start working within the next month or two on my Dog Trainer Certificate, and once I get it I’ll start contacting different organizations and see if I can help with training and/or fostering a dog. Anything, regardless of how small it seems to you, helps dogs. Remember this, We, you, me and other humans that think like us, are the advocates for these amazing dogs. Don’t let anybody discourage you. Good luck:)

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    • Thank you! I keep feeling inspired by all of the blogs I read where people are working with dogs and helping dogs and making the world a much better place to live, for humans and dogs alike. i want to be a part of that.

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  8. Great post! I have volunteered to do some admin work for the shelter in our metro area, since it’s not practical to be involved in transporting animals, but they’re too busy handling dogs to get to the management thing and maybe they don’t need that much help after all.

    I’m surprised you ran into the attitudes you described, but it probably wasn’t you personally they were dissing. It may be more an issue of people who are NOT as determined as you coming to volunteer and then fading when the going gets tough. I experienced a bit of that when I adopted an “old man”, a Doxie who nobody would take since he had skin problems and a severe case of separation anxiety. The folks at the pound kept stressing the probationary period but I was so sure we’d keep him. Well, about three days into the period, my “old girl” Doxie fell terminally ill and it was impossible — emotionally and physically — for me and my wife to give both dogs the care they needed. So…the “old man” went back and I told them thanks for pressing the probationary period issue since i now understood what they knew in their bones: you never know who can bear working with homeless unwanted dogs until you actually go through it first-hand.

    Maybe you should to revisit the ones you think you’d like to help and have some quality face time with the manager? If confronting that person with your devotion, passion, and actual practical list of skill sets you can bring to the table doesn’t get you a slot, then you’ll know you did your best. They may be using the brusque approach to weed out the faint-hearted. Whatever you do, don’t let them get you down. You’ll find your niche eventually…

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    • Unfortunately I can be fainthearted, at times, when faced with rejection. And shy. But we’ll see. Maybe I will feel stronger in a bit and be able to face the screaming meanies in person.

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  9. I can’t understand why those who help dogs belittle others who want to help also and are just starting. It would seem that there’s more work than everyone can handle.

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    • I don’t understand it either. Butterfly would like to go back to the shelter she came from and take each dog out on a walk, and give them a pep talk and a good sniffing. I think she’d even be willing to share a chicken treat or two.

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  10. I think “back in the day” people could volunteer anywhere and now there’s all the liability stuff that makes people jump through loopholes just to give. It’s a shame as far as I’m concerned, but I can understand these places not wanting to be sued.

    Just keep trying. Chin up! 🙂

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  11. There are some rescues that have become rather elitist, making it difficult for potential volunteers to qualify. It is not always due to liability, sometimes it comes down to ego issues. I remember volunteering for a weekly homeless shelter at a church; they instructed me not to socialize with the homeless guests, not to allow them in the sanctuary or to give them more than one snack. I left the church and never returned. My dream is to have enough money to have an animal rescue like the one you speak of for dogs, birds, cats and horses, at least. I would provide them with a forever home, if they were not adopted. The only reason I would ever care to have a large amount of money would be for this reason. Perhaps you could try contacting a wildlife animal rescue; the one near me is always asking for volunteers.

    Reply
    • When I get really depressed I start going to country fairs and petting zoos to hang out with the goats and rabbits and ponies and cows. But I keep wanting to bring everyone home with me. My neighbors really would not appreciate if I brought home a goat, right? Maybe?

      Reply
      • I had a ranch with lots of room for animal companions and I took advantage of the space. We lost it during the economic issues everyone has been through, but still have all of our beautiful rescue babies; my apartment houses 2 dogs and my exotic birds, my ex has one dog, and our doves, horses and chickens are at friend’s ranches. I think part of my reason for rescuing more animals than I could afford was partially due to depression over a weak marriage. I wanted to help them, but they were also filling a void in my life. I still hope for my dream rescue facility, though. To address you question regarding the goat…LOL…I LOVE them! But goats are very smelly; my neighbor had 5 and the “fragrance” would waft up the hill to my home. To this day, I can no longer eat goat cheese; it tastes like goats smell to me. 🙂 I think you might want to reconsider. But I would be very tempted by those dwarf varieties! 😉

      • But a goat would be such a great writing buddy! No more need for a shredder. I’m sure there’s some kind of pet odor removal spray that could help with the smell, right?

      • Not sure about the odor remover for goats, it may just be that these people neglected them. If you have a yard capable of housing a goat, it will certainly help you keep it free of weeds…and other plants! Gotta’ love those goats; they are so cute and have such personality!

  12. Animal rescue work is a hard life. Working with an organization invariably involves politics and personality issues. Working by yourself is much easier in that respect, of course, but, well…you are by yourself. Getting volunteers who think similarly can be next to impossible. There is also a great deal of sadness and suffering involved: homeless, unwanted animals are often ill-fed, badly mistreated and in general ill health. Our small little group works 12 hour days on average…longer in the cold months.

    That having been said, what is the point of living if the more fortunate are not helping the less fortunate (especially the weak and the innocent)? We just have to figure out what works for us. One of our volunteers gets fresh water to the animals but that’s about it. Another is able to help with vet care and, when the time arises, the simple rites of mourning and the respectful burying of those innocents who have passed despite our ministrations.

    As you say, you would probably do well with a small (i.e. manageable) at-home personal rescue operation. It would not be much different than what you already do. The world needs more people with your skills and your dedication.

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  13. I wanted to scream and shot plus stomp my feet as I read your post of shelters being so rude as to turn your desire to help away. We know many shelters that ask for money and it’s eaten up in paying administrative staff. That’s not how I want to support shelter dogs. I insist the money goes directly to caring for the dogs. We’ve always done rescue pets and I’ve often believed it was more difficult than adopting a child (I’ve done that so know the comparison). I cringe each time the national organizations for animal ads come on the television. The amount of money spent for those ads and making them runs into thousands of dollars. The money could be well spent caring for animals in harms way, not seeking more money to run a large administrative staff. Sorry – This is really a sore spot with me.

    Reply
    • You’re such a fighter, strong and articulate and staunch. I want to be more like that. I’m working on it, but when I read your posts I sit up straighter. You make me want to try harder.

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      • Thank you Rachel. We’ve had two rescue shih tzu’s with the internal ability to be perfect companion working dogs for Tom without a bit of training. I get so angry when shelters turn volunteers away. Volunteers make the very best companions within the shelters. They are there becuse they want to be and have tons of love to share with the shelter animals. I’m convinced shelter animals need love more than anything else in the world. They are like the newborns that are abandoned – the abandoned dogs need touch, soft words of encouragement, promises kept and hope. Why is it so difficult for shelters to understand this concept? It makes it hard for me to understand their concept – wait – I don’t want to understand the concept because I know it is wrong. You are a strong and loving woman. You have much to share and give. Most importantly you want to do these things. Many people are content with dumping their dogs on the side of the highway. I admire you greatly for being a special soul that is willing to take these lost and forgotten animals into your arms and gently remind them they are still loved and deserve a good home. Never believe it when someone tells you that you don’t have enough experience. I’ve read your posts. They speak for themselves.

      • You are absolutely right.I read about one volunteer at a shelter that spends the night with the dogs on the e list for the next day. She brings food and stays the night with them so they can go with love.

        The shelter I got Charlie from takes the pups from county that are old, or disabled and will be put down. She got a little 18 yr old ShitZu whose family brought him in because they don’t have time for him anymore. Really??? After 18 yrs you can just do that??? It makes me wonder what kind of life he had in that time.

      • That’s shocking! A dog who has given them eighteen years of sweetness gets thrown out when he needs the most care? I can’t fathom that.

  14. I hate how volunteer organisations where there is such a ferocious mess of politics going on that it deters competent, giving people who would really be an asset. One of my dear friends nearly had a nervous breakdown because she was constantly brow-beaten at roller derby. NOT where I would envisage nastiness and bullying. The culture of some organisations need to change, and sensitive people would be able to contribute and make their small part of the world better. You’ve made a start with Butterfly and Cricket – one day you’ll find a niche where you can use those skills on a bigger scale xxx

    Reply
  15. I’ve always wanted to visit Best Friends in Utah and volunteer. Maybe some day. You would be good at it! 🙂

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  16. Did you know you can vacation at Best Friends and spend the whole time ? A neighbor of mine did just that and ended up bringing home Jezebal, a mama poodle, who’d been rescued from a puppy mill

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  17. Suggestion:
    [I’m good at solving other people’s problems……… it’s a guy thing]
    You believe that you could be a good volunteer [so do I] so come at it this way. Interview them as though you are trying to decide if it would be a good idea for you to invest your valuable time in them!
    If they don’t measure up interview somewhere else. They would be lucky to have you. You have skills and you know how to use them. Make them convince you that they are worthy of your time.
    Terry

    Reply
  18. This is such a powerful post. I completely understand what you mean. Sometimes I feel like the places I could volunteer my time just want me to hand over the puppy chow and get out. I’ve had that feeling, but could never put it to words, so thank you!

    I get all the email updates from “Best Friends.” They have a pretty intense volunteer program/vacation thing going on. I’m not sure what all it entails, but I keep thinking…maybe someday!

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  19. Of course you could be good at it Rachel because you are already an excellent momma to your dogs, past and present! Think positive, there are enough of the others out there who will send negative vibes your way. Trust in yourself and follow your dreams. 🙂

    Reply
  20. I would go to that volunteer class. Even though they sound like overwhelmed people/jerks. Because sometimes finding the right spot to volunteer is a case of right place-right time. Plus, if you go through their class and learn about the different jobs, you might discover something you really want to do that you didn’t know about before. After that, I would call some dog trainers and see if anyone wants an assistant or apprentice or volunteer. With a few training skills under your belt, it may be easier to find a place to volunteer, because then no one would have to spend time/money to train you.

    My mom’s job is finding volunteer opportunities for high school students and she, too, found that getting anyone into the animal shelter was super duper hard. And you know, it ended up being because everyone wanted to play with kittens and no one wanted to clean out cages. She worked really hard to get a few kids in, told them to be the best volunteers ever, and then it got easier. But it meant a few kids had to sign up to clean out poop for 9 month stints.

    Reply
    • I have scrubbed poop off of the fluffy butt of a very bitey dog, numerous times. Maybe if I could have Cricket write me a recommendation, they’d take me more seriously? I love your mom’s job!

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  21. Dear Rachel, When I lived for 6 long months at the shelter, it was people like you who made the days pass more smoothly. The regular shelter workers were the Bread and volunteers like you, who were brimming with love, were the Butter. I love butter. There was one young man whose job was basically, to pet me. He was Butter, too. There is room enough for everyone who has love in their hearts for animals. Please, please, please, check your local shelter. If you feel fainthearted to go in person, and after your experiences, I don’t blame you – maybe see if you can drop off supplies? You can be the Dog Food Lady. Or the Dog Blanket Lady. Many dogs only have the bare floor to lay on. The shelter I was adopted from has one list of supplies that are needed for the actual shelter and one list for the clinic. The gift of supplies for needy animals is a great way to help. Also, you might be able to “sponsor” an animal at the shelter and help directly with its care so it gets adopted faster. Please check into this if it sounds like something you’re interested in. Thank you so much for your lovely, gentle, and loving spirit. Woof! (jumps up and licks face) love, Maggie

    Reply
  22. what ever you decide to do I wish you Luck, just wait for the right Moment Rachel. I’m sure you would be good at it . Sounds like the Job for someone like you.
    Take Care
    Sheila
    x

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  23. I know exactly what you mean! Here in Phoenix the shelters and rescues are so crying for volunteers that for the most part they make you feel like you are needed and wanted. But I have been made to feel ‘stupid’ as you have yourself described.

    If we had the money, which I never will, I would buy land in Colorado and take in dogs, cats and parrots as a rescue/sanctuary.

    Reply
    • Maybe what we need to do is bring happy people meds to the shelters, then wait a few weeks and go back. They should be much nicer by then, right?

      Reply
      • Ha! You would think it would make them happy just doing what they’re doing – but I know some are in it for the recognition and praise they get. Which is really very sad. If you aren’t there for the animals, you should not be there.

        I know at the parrot rescue I volunteer at, a lot of the volunteers are young and just want to play with the birds. Don’t get me wrong, they need that for their rehab, but the dirty work goes with it and needs to come first.

  24. You are the kind of person that makes me wish I had more money so I could help your dream come true. After adopting my first dog (beautiful Aliah who was 6 years old) from a rescue group, I volunteered with the group. It takes a special kind of person to be able to volunteer and I believe you are that person. I love dogs but my heart breaks too easily. I can’t even watch that ASPCA commercial on tv. You need to keep looking Rachel, until you find the group who appreciates all you have to give. Don’t give up. Keep looking.

    Nancy

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  25. I think you would be an asset to any animal organization. But I know what you mean about having the “teflon” to do it. Don’t give up, the animals need people like you!

    Reply
  26. Thank you for visiting my blog. I’ve had dreams of starting an animal sanctuary too…given time and money! I love my little one-eyed rescue dog–I can’t image life without her.

    Reply
  27. Rachel, I have been to Dogtown it is an awesome place. Please don’t let people get you down I voulnteered at animal shelters before and everyone is so grateful. Start slow walking the dogs they always need people to walk the dogs, training is something they break you in very slowly as some of the dogs do have issues so they need to protect you. Don’t give up as it is very rewarding, try the local SPCA they are always grateful for your help, it does not matter how the people act it matters when you see the love in the dogs eyes that you were just able to hold and cuddle even for a short moment.

    Reply
  28. You and me both!!!! I have been fascinated with Best Friends AS for years, even before the show became a hit on NatGeo…Best Friends has an excellent magazine by the way…I read their book too, how Micahel Mountain and his friends got started…One idea can change a life…well, lives in this case….I think visiting there would be like a taste of Heaven!!!!

    Reply
  29. Most of my dogs have been male and I did not realize females did this until we adopted Abbie.
    If we walk our own property, she pees once, but take her to the park and she pees on everything in sight! She will even raise her leg (she’s no lady!)

    Reply
    • Cricket grew up with mostly big brothers, I wonder if that’s why she tries to lift her leg when she pees too. She can only lift it about an inch off the ground, and still manage to pee, but she keeps trying.

      Reply
  30. I’ve volunteered at Dogtown at the Best Friends Animal Sanctuary each year for the last two years. It is a fabulous place and it gives you lots of ideas of what you can do in your own community to help dogs. This is regardless of whether you volunteer at a shelter or not. They also run workshops on how to establish an animal sanctuary, basics of dog training, and other topics. They encourage sleepovers to help dogs adjust to domestic living and so be sure to book into a pet-friendly hotel. It is a peaceful setting and I always come away feeling like I have made a difference. Highly recommended as a vacation destination for all dog lovers.

    These are but a few of my experiences there:

    http://doggymom.com/2013/05/11/sleeping-with-timothy/
    http://doggymom.com/2013/05/13/at-angels-rest/
    http://doggymom.com/2013/05/15/my-temporary-dogs/

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  31. I hear you! Sometimes dog people can be like the worst horse people…all egos. I understand your feelings. I would love to have my own dog town someday, too. I just know my spouse is not there with me on that. (He thinks having 6 dachshunds IS dogtown, and he has a point). Anyway, don’t let other peoples agendas ruin your own. When you have a huge heart you should fill it by doing what you need to do. There is always a way. Maybe find someone in your life who feels the way you do, and go forward as a team. That will help you fight off the naysayers.

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  32. What a sweet post. We can change lives one moment at a time.

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  33. Bummer that the dog rescue outfit near you is so short-sighted.There are a bazillion things a volunteer can do. Even a spin around the yard is a huge bonus for a dog in a shelter. Hope you can find an option that is more supportive.

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  34. Hi Rachel, thanks for liking my blog post on Finney in France. I haven’t really been able to get going with the blog as I don’t even know how to embed an infographic, but I’m working on learning that and other tools now so I hope to be posting regularly before too long.

    I’m from Boston, but lived in Ireland for 11 years before moving to France last year. I tried for all of those 11 years to convince the local animal rescue group to take me on as their education officer (I had rescue experience and teaching experience) and it was a position they needed filIed by a volunteer. I finally badgered them enough, they took me on, and before I could start we sold our house after five years of trying so I had to tell them I couldn’t do the job after all. They didn’t even have the courtesy to thank me for trying so hard to help them for all those years or to say a simple goodbye and good luck. People are strange sometimes.

    If you look around you’ll find a niche to fill if you truly have the desire, which it sounds as if you do. You know the old question: what would you do if money were no object? For me, it would be to spend my life helping save dogs and changing their often difficult plight in the world.

    By the way, Canine Massage programs exist in many places. Some just for owners, but some for people who want to become practitioners. I have researched them pretty extensively as I would like to practice here in France, but have not had the time and money to choose a program and apply. Some programs are better than others, as with most things, so if you should want to have a look a doing one just keep that in mind.

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  35. I love your blog and I especially love this post! Best Friends is my FAVORITE organization! I have yet to see this show you’re talking about, but now I want to run right out and watch it!!

    Reply
  36. What channel was this TV show on? I would be interested to watch that. Also, I understand your frustration with wanting to volunteer and not knowing how to get started. Sometimes rescues an shelters need help in different ways, for example my time is limited these days, but I still want to help so I assist a rescue with social media and community outreach. Those types of jobs are so necessary, but don’t require you to actually handle pets too much.

    Reply
    • The last time I checked, the Dogtown repeats were on the National Geographic channel, or Nat Geo Wild.

      I think I would lose my mind if I was actually surrounded by dogs but not allowed to play with them. I might spiral into a deep depression, and need a lot of pet therapy to help me out of it.

      Reply
  37. Rachel,

    I swear we are twins! I feel the same exact way on every level. That’s why I have 5 rescues!! I’ve tried working in non-profit but it’s high stress and you’re always begging for $$$. But to beg for all the sweet babies out there that deserve more…now THAT’S a different story! I’ve often thought, if I could just pay my bills and help the animals…

    As for being treated like you’re not good enough…girl, I applied to adopt a rescue and the woman drilled me with like 100 questions, back and forth back and forth, and basically told me she wasn’t sure about me. I told her she had a ton of pics of doggies that need homes on her website, and she was going to be stuck with all of them if she didn’t get a clue!! Holy cow, I was ready to pay a $200 adoption fee…..are you nuts lady!!??

    So never feel like you’re alone in this dream, I’m right there with you!!

    -Cher

    Reply
    • It’s nice to have company! When I went to the shelter just to look (and of course picked out Butterfly, because who can go there just to look?) I saw at least ten dogs I would have liked to take home, if I had a yard for them to run in. The way the shelter is organized, you have to walk through the big dog area to get to the small dogs, and then to the puppies. It’s a very smart layout. I think we were there for three hours, with all of the paper work, but it felt like seconds.

      Reply
  38. Pingback: Dogtown… by Rachel Mankowitz | Hans Howe

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